To Protect and to Serve in the Wilderness of South Africa

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To protect and to serve – these words aren’t merely the dictum of US police departments. They’re what drive so many conservationists in Africa, fighting each day to conserve the Earth we call home.

They’re the words of special people like Adine Roode, Camp Jabulani lodge owner and elephant conservationist, and her team, who continue to inspire hope with their efforts to save the elephants and other endangered species of the continent in their special place in the Kapama Private Game Reserve in South Africa.

Following their adventures adds a wild spark to our days back home, in the city, as they remind us that there is always hope as long as individuals continue to, well, protect and conserve.

In Adine’s own words, here is an update on another successful introduction of an elephant orphan to the Camp Jabulani herd.


One of the Most Exceptional Cycling Experiences Ever

It has been called the ultimate cycling safari. A mountain biking experience to rival all other mountain biking experiences. And an event for only a chosen few: a powerful pride of protectors, preservers and legacy builders. The concept behind the Great Plains Foundation’s Ride For Lions will make you want to be part of that pride, no matter how daunting it looks…

Discover more about the journey here, or as told by the Great Plains Foundation below…

Lions need land. They need hidden places, not always prime savannahs, to breed and to roam as nomads. They need this land now more than ever as a reservoir for their dwindling numbers.

There are an estimated 44 million acres of land in Africa on which lions roam that is currently unprotected or under hunting management. 60% of the remaining 20-30,000 lions live under no protection at all on this land. Great Plains is working to change these numbers and protect more land for lions.

Through the Great Plains Foundation’s Ride For Lions, conservation-minded individuals and companies help fund and expand the amount of conserved land where lions roam freely. We do this through the purchase of land leases that cost roughly $250,000 to service and protect each year. In many cases, these leases are parcels of ex hunting land where the animal populations have significantly declined. Through programs and partnerships that rehabilitate the land and wildlife while mitigating human-wildlife conflict we have seen areas once desolate, become safe havens where lions and other wildlife return in abundance.


Participants in Ride For Lions not only demonstrate a commitment to conservation, but also intimately experience the land being conserved throughout the course of the ride.

Groups are limited to just 10 members. In keeping with the singular intimacy of this experience, riders gain a greater appreciation for the land undistracted by large groups.

A ride like this is unprecedented; combining an on-the-ground conservation experience with the comforts and security of Great Plains operations. It is a 4-day exploration of Kenya’s priceless Amboseli-Tsavo region: a showcase of Nature’s grand-scale artistry and wildlife spectacles. It is this magnificence that riders witness, experience and conserve.

Graced by the presence of Mt Kilimanjaro, riders follow bush tracks, elephant trails and footpaths. From the vast swathes of savannahs with green smudges of game-rich wetlands, riders gradually ascend into the lava world of the Chyulu Hills.

At these higher elevations, the verdant slopes tumble towards the great plains of Africa that extend forever.

Ride for Lions is imbued with the Great Plains defining ethos: exquisite attention to detail, luxurious finishes, beautifully appointed locations, non-negotiable safety measures, fine dining and inimitable style. Riders enjoy a perfect synergy of exceptional touring and exceptional care.

There are echoes of the Hero’s Journey in this spectacular event. Like the archetypal Hero, riders have embraced a great adventure together, shared experiences, endured challenges, triumphed, emerged with new insights, and, most importantly, making a heroic difference to African conservation.

Contact info@greatplainsconservation.com for more information on joining Ride For Lions.


Watch the Video for a Closer Look


What Leopards Can Teach Us About Being Human

“Maybe it’s animalness that will make the world right again: the wisdom of elephants, the enthusiasm of canines, the grace of snakes, the mildness of anteaters. Perhaps being human needs some diluting.” ― Carol Emshwiller.

After three days spent beside a leopard and her cub in a foresty corner of the Maasai Mara, I’d like to add leopard to this mix. I’m sure Carol would welcome it and agree that wisdom, enthusiasm, grace and mildness are all traits of this big cat, and that it’s impossible not to question your own humanity after time in their presence.

I questioned a lot of things after my time with the leopard they call Fig and her new young thing perched in the trees at Mara Plains Camp in Kenya. After game drives, I returned to camp beneath trees of my own and pondered about life, sitting on my deck looking over the plains. In that way safaris make you look at life from a different angle, and think about things like what it means to be a mother, the importance of naps and how we really should climb more trees.

I thought that if anything, the leopard might just be able to teach us how to be better humans.

With these cats, as much as there was a time to chase her mother’s snaking tail while she slept, sloped along a fallen tree, there was a time for Figlet (Fig Junior) to collapse beside her, calm, quiet, still. A time for tenderness.

As much as there was a time to roll and tumble wildly together in the shade of their kingdom beneath the trees, there was time for that charm and elegance leopards are known for, the adults at least. Like wisdom, grace would find the cub in later years, when jumping out of the bush at unsuspecting butterflies with a little too much enthusiasm would become a slow, flowing, elegant stalk toward a lone gazelle.

It isn’t that humans need diluting, we just need some reminding, from the wilderness, from nature. Wisdom, enthusiasm, grace and tenderness – that’s all we have to hold onto, that’s all the leopards were showing me, that’s all that’s needed, Carol was saying, to make the world right again.

Discover more about Mara Plains Camp here.